October 2, 1992 by D. Strange (submitted by R)

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People’s property given to criminals,

The best economic plan.

Happiness is not guaranteed.

Reports show continued weakness.

A summer camp for sheep

Pumpkins and gourds take precedence,

The smell of skunk penetrates your dream.

I do not know D. Strange, but apparently, he/she makes poems  from cut-up and rearranged newspaper excerpts. I like this idea and will try to copy it here soon.

The Slithery Dee

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The slithery dee,

He came out of the sea;

He ate all the others,

But he didn’t eat me.

The slithery dee, He came out of the sea;

He ate all the others,

But he didn’t eat—

SL-U-R-P…

 This was taken from Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz with illustrations by Stephen Gammel. The stories were collected from many sources and those sources are credited in the back of the book, but I couldn’t find the original author for this one.

The SStTitD series terrified me as a kid, which is probably why it was so popular at the time. The Slithery Dee was not one of my favorite parts then, but I like it more now. The figure in the illustration is supposed to be the narrator, I think. The titular ‘Dee’ is not shown and barely described. I would imagine it was probably slithery.

Inspirational Spam Comment

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A spoon containing breakfast cereal flakes, pa...

this is much less icky than gaebul.

I usually don’t look at the spam comments that get filtered out by WordPress, but today I did, and this comment immediately grabbed me.

What is Gaebull‽ I didn’t know, but I knew I had to find out, so I looked it up.

The closest I could find was 개불 (gaebul), a Korean word for a kind of (apparently delicious) marine spoon worm. I don’t know what could make a worm spoony either, but I did not try to find out because some things in this world should stay mysterious.

The Jumblies by Edward Lear

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They went to sea in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they went to sea:
In spite of all their friends could say,
On a winter’s morn, on a stormy day,
In a Sieve they went to sea!
And when the Sieve turned round and round,
And every one cried, `You’ll all be drowned!’
They called aloud, `Our Sieve ain’t big,
But we don’t care a button! we don’t care a fig!
In a Sieve we’ll go to sea!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed away in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they sailed so fast,
With only a beautiful pea-green veil
Tied with a riband by way of a sail,
To a small tobacco-pipe mast;
And every one said, who saw them go,
`O won’t they be soon upset, you know!
For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long,
And happen what may, it’s extremely wrong
In a Sieve to sail so fast!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

The water it soon came in, it did,
The water it soon came in;
So to keep them dry, they wrapped their feet
In a pinky paper all folded neat,
And they fastened it down with a pin.
And they passed the night in a crockery-jar,
And each of them said, `How wise we are!
Though the sky be dark, and the voyage be long,
Yet we never can think we were rash or wrong,
While round in our Sieve we spin!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

And all night long they sailed away;
And when the sun went down,
They whistled and warbled a moony song
To the echoing sound of a coppery gong,
In the shade of the mountains brown.
`O Timballo! How happy we are,
When we live in a Sieve and a crockery-jar,
And all night long in the moonlight pale,
We sail away with a pea-green sail,
In the shade of the mountains brown!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed to the Western Sea, they did,
To a land all covered with trees,
And they bought an Owl, and a useful Cart,
And a pound of Rice, and a Cranberry Tart,
And a hive of silvery Bees.
And they bought a Pig, and some green Jack-daws,
And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws,
And forty bottles of Ring-Bo-Ree,
And no end of Stilton Cheese.
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

And in twenty years they all came back,
In twenty years or more,
And every one said, `How tall they’ve grown!
For they’ve been to the Lakes, and the Torrible Zone,
And the hills of the Chankly Bore!’
And they drank their health, and gave them a feast
Of dumplings made of beautiful yeast;
And every one said, `If we only live,
We too will go to sea in a Sieve,—
To the hills of the Chankly Bore!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.


I like Edward Lear because he called his own work ‘Nonsense’ and still thought it was worth publishing.  It was and the world is a better place for it.  I think.

Anyway, I would very much like to follow his example, but I’m not sure if it would still work today.